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Can I transfer responsibility of repair of appliances to tenants?

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Author Topic: Can I transfer responsibility of repair of appliances to tenants?  (Read 141 times)
Newbie
Posts: 9

I like property

« on: October 15, 2021, 11:58:06 AM »

Hi all, hope you are well.

Iíd be grateful of any advice on the following.

My tenants are currently on a fixed term (12 month) tenancy and after it expires it will automatically move to periodic with no expiry date.

At the end of the fixed term I want to increase the rent slightly and make alterations to the contract. Iíve been advised I can edit the addendum which is currently in place (by the Letting Agent).

I currently provide kitchen appliances (fridge freezer, oven, dishwasher and washer dryer) so itís currently my responsibility to get them repaired if needed (which I have been doing but is expensive).

I'd like to transfer the responsibility of repair of appliances / good working order terms etc. to tenants.

If the tenants stay in the property can I update the agreement to reflect the above?

However, if the tenants leave and I get a new tenants, can I from the start state the appliances come with the property, but the tenant is responsible for them?
(I understand some Landlords donít offer white goods at all so they donít have this cost or repair etc.)

Many Thanks,
Betty.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2021, 12:07:29 PM by Betty »
Accidental Landlord
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Posts: 101

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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2021, 12:33:37 PM »

Hi, I actually don't think Landlords are allowed to make the tenants responsible for repairs of items like this. Could be wrong, I often am so hope others will chime in. I only provide the basics of double oven and hob which I insure. I did once replace a defective extractor fan.The total cost is not too bad and gives me the peace of mind I am willing to pay for. However, once the premium becomes too much and/or these appliance become too old I usually stop insurance payments and use that to save up towards new replacements instead which will then come with at least the manufacture's warranty for the first year. I would personally not provide fridge, washing machine or dishwasher but that's me.
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2021, 01:56:43 PM »

I was surprised to learn on here that landlords are not legally bound to repair white goods.I have always considered it my  duty to do so though.I think it would be quite off-putting to new tenants,and I doubt if your current tenants will be too happy if you say they must be responsible.
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2021, 04:44:01 PM »

It's not really about what you legally can do... get people to sign... pressure or bully folk into accepting... it's about whether you want to supply white goods with the property you are letting. If you do then I think - morally - it's going to fall to you to look after repairs. If you don't then obviously you don't.

In a sense this Landlord is looking for the best of both worlds... having the white goods in place at the beginning of tenancy to make the property look attractive, then wash your hands of any repairing obligations (from a moral sense of the word).

What I found particularly unappealing about this plan the Landlord has... they don't want to transfer ownership of the appliances... the Landlord will still own them... just the repairing responsibility for the appliances gets formally passed over to the Tenants. What special kind of sucker would agree to that apart from someone who felt they had to? If the Landlord was saying - "Actually, I'd like to wash my hands of the appliances altogether" then maybe, at a stretch... but still very little advantage to the Tenant (who is already reeling from a rent increase). Where does it end? The roof? What a good plan, nothing can go wrong.

Landlord: "I'd like to retain ownership of the roof of this house, obviously, but if it ever leaks I would like you to take on the cost of having it repaired - after all, you're using it, not me."
Tenant: "OK, sounds good."
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2021, 05:17:26 PM »

Yes,I agree.I used to put  portable televisions in the studios,telling tenants they could use them,take them away,sell them etc.as long as I did not have to repair them. Before this I had people ringing at 10pm.complaining that the reception was bad,could I come up and tune the TV.
I think this landlord could offer to gift the appliances.Thet may not be happy with that though. I know someone who is currently renting when she could afford to buy,just because she does not want the hassle of dealing with repairs.
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2021, 05:56:27 PM »

I must say I've never found the cost of repairing white goods to be a significant expense - maybe £100 every couple of years, if that. What happens when the appliance reaches a point where it's beyond economic repair? Is the tenant obliged to keep throwing money at it or, if not, who replaces it?

I agree with Hippogriff on this one: it's best to stick to whatever was the deal when the tenants first signed up. I go by the rule that I look after my tenants, and my tenants look after my property. It doesn't always work out like that but it's a good place to start, and certainly better than the opposite.
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2021, 10:05:05 PM »

Yes,I agree.I used to put  portable televisions in the studios...

You're showing your age if you can remember those non-portable televisions.
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2021, 09:47:17 AM »

I know,I must stop giving these clues if I want to come across as a 30-year old.
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