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Moved into property - issue with carpets

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Author Topic: Moved into property - issue with carpets  (Read 120 times)
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« on: July 14, 2021, 07:22:28 PM »

Hi :)

I just started a new tenancy. Something which I've noticed is that the carpets are rather worn and torn. I did briefly acknowledge this during viewing but I don't think I fully registered this at the time (my fault, I know).

The other thing is that the biggest wear and tear appears to be under a mat that's placed in the apartment. This wasn't something I saw during the viewing as it was covered (but is mentioned on the inventory form at move in). The mat itself is also rather curled up at the edges, to the point that I've ended up tripping over it a couple of times. So I guess the questions that I have are:

1) Is wear and tear like this reasonable grounds to ask for the agency to change the carpets?
2) If not, am I allowed to ask for the mat to be changed as it's a tripping hazard?

Many thanks :)
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2021, 08:59:01 PM »

1) It's reasonable to ask but it's also reasonable for the landlord or agent to say no.
2) It's reasonable to ask but it's also reasonable for the landlord or agent to say no.
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2021, 11:23:22 PM »

1) It's reasonable to ask but it's also reasonable for the landlord or agent to say no.
2) It's reasonable to ask but it's also reasonable for the landlord or agent to say no.

Thanks :)
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2021, 09:59:10 AM »

Just a thought.Might it be worth moving the mat out of the way so you don't keep tripping over it? Another idea,double- sided tape is very cheap,so you could secure the edges that are sticking up.Time for some blue-sky thinking.
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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2021, 10:05:59 AM »

You can ask anything. I also think most things are reasonable... but it's often about how you approach it. Mentioning something like this in the first week, for example, could easily make the person receiving the request start to think you're going to be a high maintenance Tenant. This may, or may not, be true... but, like you said, you had the opportunity to check things - and mention things you weren't happy with - at the viewing - and before signing. I realise many people get emotional about property dealings... excitable etc., and sometimes prospective Tenants may think it's better to wait until everything is signed and sealed before raising something - wrong. It is always the best approach to mention something before signing... then both parties know what they're getting into. A prospective Tenant can assess how reasonable a Landlord (Agent) is. A Landlord can gauge whether the Tenant is one who is reasonable in their requests... or whether they're liable to become a nightmare.

So, in your case, if you accept you've gone about this in a backwards way... and you accept you had plenty of opportunity to mention it... and you accept it's detailed in the Inventory (which you presumably signed, therefore agreed)... maybe you should be conscious of something like caveat emptor... it's not really that, though, as it appears nothing was disguised, or done underhand, or needed checking in abnormal great detail... you had every opportunity, everything was there for you to see and raise, but you did nothing. You were happy to sign. Where's the buyer's remorse coming from now?

This doesn't mean don't ask. It means... don't be tempted to edge over the line into demanding.
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« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2021, 10:15:19 PM »

Just a thought.Might it be worth moving the mat out of the way so you don't keep tripping over it? Another idea,double- sided tape is very cheap,so you could secure the edges that are sticking up.Time for some blue-sky thinking.

The issue is - the mat seems to have been placed there for the sole purpose of covering a significant majority of wear and tear, so removing it would really lead to the place looking a bit odd :/

I shall consider the sticky tape suggestion however.
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2021, 10:19:44 PM »

You can ask anything. I also think most things are reasonable... but it's often about how you approach it. Mentioning something like this in the first week, for example, could easily make the person receiving the request start to think you're going to be a high maintenance Tenant. This may, or may not, be true... but, like you said, you had the opportunity to check things - and mention things you weren't happy with - at the viewing - and before signing. I realise many people get emotional about property dealings... excitable etc., and sometimes prospective Tenants may think it's better to wait until everything is signed and sealed before raising something - wrong. It is always the best approach to mention something before signing... then both parties know what they're getting into. A prospective Tenant can assess how reasonable a Landlord (Agent) is. A Landlord can gauge whether the Tenant is one who is reasonable in their requests... or whether they're liable to become a nightmare.

So, in your case, if you accept you've gone about this in a backwards way... and you accept you had plenty of opportunity to mention it... and you accept it's detailed in the Inventory (which you presumably signed, therefore agreed)... maybe you should be conscious of something like caveat emptor... it's not really that, though, as it appears nothing was disguised, or done underhand, or needed checking in abnormal great detail... you had every opportunity, everything was there for you to see and raise, but you did nothing. You were happy to sign. Where's the buyer's remorse coming from now?

This doesn't mean don't ask. It means... don't be tempted to edge over the line into demanding.

This is interesting! I was initially thinking to ask ASAP because I thought that if I asked later, they may turn around and say ‘well you had ample opportunity to ask earlier, why’s it become an issue now?’ but tbh, I see your point more

So the thing is that most wear and tear was actually hidden under the mat during viewing, so I didn’t see the full extent of it. Could this help my case do you reckon?
« Last Edit: July 15, 2021, 10:23:51 PM by NewKidInTown »
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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2021, 10:20:44 PM »

And sorry - two posts without a single thank you to the both of you for giving up your time to help me…

Thanks both, I really appreciate it :)
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2021, 10:48:21 PM »

to me this seems straightforward,  the inventory on move in had "carpet damage under rug" written in it and you signed it off saying all good. so you can't now turn around later and say it's a problem, (you can try but unlikely to get much luck unless landlord is super nice), unless that is not the case and you didn't sign it/misunderstood it/or it was disguised in the small print somehow, then you maybe have a case?

also one word about carpets, beware if they are dirty/worn/unclean this can lead to allergy problems so in future requesting professional steam clean before move in would be best. (learnt the hard way on that one!)
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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2021, 11:29:25 AM »

The incoming Tenant can ask... the warning is to be reasonable about it for the reasons mentioned. If an Agent is involved... it's perfectly possible for the Landlord to be so "hands-off" that they have no idea of the general condition of their property (not good, but perfectly possible)... an Agent just sends them a headline - "everything's fine" - and they are blissfully unaware. It might be the case that the Landlord, becoming aware, might elect to do something. Carpets are not that expensive... and I'm not even talking about "Landlord specials".
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