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Damaged flooring

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Author Topic: Damaged flooring  (Read 107 times)
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« on: February 04, 2021, 09:39:18 PM »

Hello! We are struggling with a little problem. The house we began to rent recently (and are living in) had been rented to us with really badly damaged laminate flooring in the living room. It it clear that whoever lived at the house (potentially the landlord) didn't know how these should have been fitted and went and done it all without underlayment. The floor was lifting when we came to view the house and was banged in by the agency prior ro receiving our keys.I have documented this in my inventory and made a disclaimer to the agency that due to the obvious poor condition we don't want to be responsible for the repair if it breaks anymore from natural tear and wear. With three months down, the floor has already started to lift again and resulted in damaged corner on one of the panels. Should the landlord be responsible for replacing this badly done flooring? There is nothing I can do to stop it from breaking even more.

Thank you, for any advice/information. 
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2021, 12:35:03 AM »

From a deposit point of view simply email photos and detail the wear and tear in an email to your agent. Then keep records to show you reported this issue.

If you want it repaired then ask the agent but it likely won't be a priority right now.
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2021, 10:28:07 AM »

A few observations...

The OP says the property had been rented to them with really badly damaged laminate flooring... but they weren't forced to take it, especially not if this was an issue... they chose to take it, one assumes after a viewing... I'd be wondering if that viewing didn't pick this up because it wasn't so bad at the time, or whether it was noticed and it was assumed (always a bad idea) it'd be rectified before move-in... but the Tenant is the customer here - they'll choose where to spend their money... and it should be normal practice (I believe) for prospective Tenants to ask about things they're not happy about at, or shortly after, viewings but before tenancy commencement - that way both sides get a view of their potential business partner.

As said... as long as there are photos of the flooring at the beginning (not your own Inventory - what's this? - "I have documented this in my inventory" - do you mean your copy? You can mark-up your copy in isolation as much as you want... but it won't hold any ground if it doesn't match up with the copy held by the Agent / Landlord... the idea of an Inventory and Schedule of Condition is that it details the contents and state of the property at the beginning of the tenancy... and can be jointly updated if any changes arise... you can't just start adding things mid-tenancy that you've spotted and not make the two sides consistent... I may well have misunderstood here, but that's how it reads. So, if you want to make disclaimers... at least ensure everyone is on the same page.

As said... the best way to approach repairs (because everything has a cost, right?) is via communication. I think it's massively better to have a repaired floor for the tenancy for you, rather than document it's crappy situation and live with it... depending on how it is I'd at the very least consider it some form of trip hazard... so easily classified as a safety issue... the balance here is approaching the Agent (hopefully Landlord) with a view that tells them that a little outlay with benefit them in the long-run. That would be my advice if you've not already taken it... from the sounds of it, yes, the Landlord would be responsible for costs, not you... but whether you can force the issue so that something actually happens is another question entirely. Especially if you, yourself, don't fancy Trades coming in and out of your home in the current climate.

And my final piece of advice... just to hide the issue from your eyes being drawn to it every time, and it getting worse... have you considered if a rug is suitable short-term?
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2021, 02:23:26 PM »

I would cover with carpet as suggested,then push for it to be done as soon as lockdown ends.Having a new floor is best done when you can get out of the house for the day.
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2021, 10:41:06 AM »

A few observations...

The OP says the property had been rented to them with really badly damaged laminate flooring... but they weren't forced to take it, especially not if this was an issue... they chose to take it, one assumes after a viewing... I'd be wondering if that viewing didn't pick this up because it wasn't so bad at the time, or whether it was noticed and it was assumed (always a bad idea) it'd be rectified before move-in... but the Tenant is the customer here - they'll choose where to spend their money... and it should be normal practice (I believe) for prospective Tenants to ask about things they're not happy about at, or shortly after, viewings but before tenancy commencement - that way both sides get a view of their potential business partner.

As said... as long as there are photos of the flooring at the beginning (not your own Inventory - what's this? - "I have documented this in my inventory" - do you mean your copy? You can mark-up your copy in isolation as much as you want... but it won't hold any ground if it doesn't match up with the copy held by the Agent / Landlord... the idea of an Inventory and Schedule of Condition is that it details the contents and state of the property at the beginning of the tenancy... and can be jointly updated if any changes arise... you can't just start adding things mid-tenancy that you've spotted and not make the two sides consistent... I may well have misunderstood here, but that's how it reads. So, if you want to make disclaimers... at least ensure everyone is on the same page.

As said... the best way to approach repairs (because everything has a cost, right?) is via communication. I think it's massively better to have a repaired floor for the tenancy for you, rather than document it's crappy situation and live with it... depending on how it is I'd at the very least consider it some form of trip hazard... so easily classified as a safety issue... the balance here is approaching the Agent (hopefully Landlord) with a view that tells them that a little outlay with benefit them in the long-run. That would be my advice if you've not already taken it... from the sounds of it, yes, the Landlord would be responsible for costs, not you... but whether you can force the issue so that something actually happens is another question entirely. Especially if you, yourself, don't fancy Trades coming in and out of your home in the current climate.

And my final piece of advice... just to hide the issue from your eyes being drawn to it every time, and it getting worse... have you considered if a rug is suitable short-term?

Hi, thank you so much for such a detailed response. I appreciate your time and help! And the Inventory has been sent to me after moving into the property. We had time to adjust it and both us and the agency have the same copy where we were able to upload our own photos before signing and submitting. You see I never thought of taking this situation that way and telling them it a trip hazard. Technically, I could say that because the flooring lifts up where the base us uneven so realistically it is a massive health hazard. I will try to contact my agent and see what I can do. A massive thank you again!

PS. We already have a rug, however it doesn't cover the whole area.
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2021, 10:46:02 AM »

Buying a bigger rug is always a fun activity anyway. A rug is for life, not just for Christmas... but there could still be sales on.
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