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Garantor on Rent.

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Author Topic: Garantor on Rent.  (Read 151 times)
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« on: June 17, 2021, 12:57:57 PM »

Hi There,
             Our tenants father has apparently just been diagnosed as terminally ill. Without being callous, he is the tenants Guarantor. Of course we have no idea of situation re timeline, but should we be bringing this to the Agents attention. The tenant is on a month by month contract, due to the Agent not being able to sort out paperwork during Covid. She was apparently happy with this [ No Surprise!], and as it goes so were and are we. We are currently considering our options, and intend to raise the rent this year. We were guilt tripped into not doing so last year by the agent, due to Covid, and tenants potentially struggling for money.
The tenant is also not doing maintenance as required, due to her father being ill, and does not know when she will be able to do some items that are her responsibility.

Any Thoughts Please.

 :-\
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2021, 06:55:01 PM »

I would not get too bothered about the guarantor aspect.They are not much use when it comes down to it. A change of circumstances for the guarantor,real or claimed, will  usually be enough to cancel them.You don't say how long the tenant has lived there,or if she has been able to pay the rent herself. A periodic tenancy is just as preferable for the landlord as the tenant. I would certainly not have dreamt of putting up any rents in the last year.Most landlords would just be grateful if tenants did not get into arrears.What are the matters that she is not doing while caring for her Dad? If she has previously been a good tenant,can't you cut her a bit of slack,hold back on the rent increase for now,and come to some agreement regarding the outstanding chores?
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2021, 09:59:04 AM »

This post raises a fair number of questions. I recall from previous posts made by the OP that the property was potentially going up for sale at one point and the Landlord had issues with a dog and maintenance issues before, which caused them to become frustrated with the Tenant... hence the username I guess. But they also wanted to can the Agent at one point. So it seems to me this endeavour is not really going very well and turning-out how the OP hoped and it's probably best to get out of the game... everyone will be happier.

I'd serve the correct notice, even if it's necessarily quite long-term as of now... give everyone chance to level-set and move on to some other investment vehicle.
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2021, 10:14:59 AM »

Ah,I see.Context is everything in a situation like this. All in all,it does sound like it's more trouble than it's worth to continue. 
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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2021, 08:13:57 PM »

Thank You All, I think we  are going to have to revert back to the Agent.  The tenant has never failed to pay the rent, However when she caused some significant damage to a ceiling , we repaired it to our spec, [My husband is a qualified builder of many years.] We advised the Agent of the cost for materials etc, and over one month later, still no payment. We have found that  urgency for repairs and replacements always falls in favour of the needs of the tenant . We have always acted promptly to address any issues, but the same cannot be said for the tenant, even before her family issues. We have cut a lot of slack already, and it makes us despondent to see the lack of care and maintenance in some areas.
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2021, 09:49:27 AM »

I'm not quite clear on why you think you can just demand money from the Tenant mid-tenancy for a repair. Unless it was by agreement, then of course you should get paid. But this isn't entirely clear.

A Tenant provides a Deposit at the start of the tenancy and the normal mode of operation is that this is held (by a Scheme or directly by a Landlord, via a Scheme) until the tenancy ends... then anything that is, or has been, an issue is given some kind of monetary value and it's hopefully agreed when the tenancy ends. The Landlord is compensated. It's not unheard of for mid-term tenancy repairs to take place and an agreement to be reached. I am just wondering - with your lack of experience - how you've gone about this? I ask because it feels, to me, like there's assumptions from your side... I could be wrong, it could all be clearly documented. I can only go on the words you use... it seems some damage was caused (was it agreed that it was caused, or may the Tenant claim it just happened - and is therefore your responsibility?), it seems you repaired it (if it is the Tenant's responsibility then usually they'd have some say in how that is done), and the Agent was advised of the costs (but advising someone of something doesn't mean they agree, does it?). What slack have you cut? I wonder if you're expectations are realistic, that's all. They could be - it's just not clear - and you seem to be letting it all get to you... it's a business, treat it like a business. No-one should get despondent, not really. You have a Tenant who has never missed rent... in the grand scheme of things I'd like to change places with you!

Every Landlord always says they acted promptly to fix issues. Any Landlord always says they've been good and fair. I tell you now, there's never been a Landlord on here who's put their hands-up and told us they're awful.
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