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Unreasonable landlord or just me ?

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Author Topic: Unreasonable landlord or just me ?  (Read 340 times)
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« on: January 31, 2020, 08:30:57 AM »

When I viewed my flat for the first time I advised the landlord that my partners pet would be staying with me, she said this was fine. I gave my landlord my notice due to securing another property and she has told me to remove the pets 1 month before my tenancy ends for veiwings . Anyone with a brain knows you can't move your pets out before you can, they have nowhere to go. Is this unreasonable? Her argument it is not my pet but my argument is she knows I look after my partners pet and always have done since first point of the agreement. So now I am having to leave the flat a month early before my new tenancy starts with the pet  even though I have just paid 1 months rent. And the thing is the pet needs daily care as it is not well and on daily medication
« Last Edit: January 31, 2020, 08:40:08 AM by Aldo2020 »
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2020, 09:02:56 AM »

I think you can just refuse. Politely, if needs be... less than politely if you feel like it. The request is unreasonable on moral grounds, so stand your ground. One assumes your next place is already sorted, so what can the Landlord do? It would be nice if you had a written agreement for your specific situation, of course.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2020, 12:18:56 PM by Hippogriff »
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2020, 11:47:33 AM »

No,you are certainly not in the wrong.Just carry on as planned.The landlord is being very unfair to you.
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2020, 02:37:02 PM »

On the other hand, you haven't said what sort of pet it is.

If it's a leopard, your landlord may have a point.
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2020, 02:55:29 AM »

If it's not your pet why not give it back to the owner during your notice period? I can understand a landlord not wanting an animal in it's property when they are showing it to prospective tenants and it doesn't even belong to the tenant. It sounds like the landlord was accommodating until now when they need to find a new tenant.

When I moved in to my flat it took me a few days to realise my legs were being ravaged by fleas left behind from the last tenant's cat. They had moved in to the flat below me so after I told the landlord they bought me a can of Indorex. I had already bought one but it was a nice gesture.
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2020, 11:10:01 AM »

Agreements will often have clauses in there that stipulate a Tenant must provide access for viewings shortly before the end of the tenancy. They're kinda unenforceable, they bank on people being well-behaved and friendly. Just as the Tenant could effectively refuse access throughout the tenancy, that same capability exists now. What the OP needs to understand are the consequences of refusing the instruction and refusing access. My assumption has been, that at this late stage, the next place is already set-up, so it can't be references... anything taken from the Deposit would be taken anyway and unaffected by the pet(s) staying for a month longer... so what are the consequences... if they're limited to an angry (unreasonable) Landlord, then so be it?

The OP clearly stated that prior to the tenancy starting the Landlord was advised that the OP's partner's pet would be staying, and said that was OK. Ownership at that point becomes moot, really. The pet is in place.. the pet has its own home, there. The pet has its owner - in its eyes and the eyes of the Landlord... the OP never claimed they told the Landlord it would be a temporary arrangement. So the Landlord is coming across, at least, as being a bit petty.

Pun absolutely intended. Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

All that said, any viewer paying a modicum of attention will detect a pet without it actually being there (unless it's a goldfish or something, I suppose).
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2020, 11:12:06 AM »

When I moved in to my flat it took me a few days to realise my legs were being ravaged by fleas left behind from the last tenant's cat.

This is, of course, an assumption... not provable. The person who moved into the place you'd vacated could have their own problems, of an identical nature, and be making their own assumptions about your cat... nevertheless, the solution could be the same.
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2020, 12:29:42 PM »

I find it is very rare to get new tenants interested while someone is still in situ,unless they are extremely minimalist and never cook.Some of mine have  homes like storage units,crammed full.I can't see that the presence of a pet should put anyone off.It would make me think that the landlord must be a lovely kind and caring person to allow it.I am wondering if the landlord does not want to create a precedent,having decided to ban pets from now on.The idea that the pet should be returned to the owner is hardly realistic,presumably they are away from home a lot.
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« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2020, 07:46:43 PM »

It is a guinea pig and it is in my care as it needs medication every 8 hours and my partner cannot do this due to work commitments where as I can work it around my work as my shifts are more flexible
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« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2020, 10:27:33 AM »

They want you to move a guinea pig out of the flat for viewings? They are ickle wickle sweethearts. Would you like to borrow one of my psycho dogs,to give her something to really worry about?
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