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Sudden clause in a rental contract regarding required dehumidifier run

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Author Topic: Sudden clause in a rental contract regarding required dehumidifier run  (Read 175 times)
Newbie
Posts: 1

I like property

« on: July 12, 2021, 11:01:22 PM »

Hi, everyone. I'm fairly new to a rental market, so would appreciate any help

I'm looking to move into a new flat(in a Victorian house, if it's matter, London), and I've received a contract to sign with a sudden clause:
that tenants must use reasonable efforts to adequately heat and ventilate the premises in order to help prevent condensation(which is not a surprise, I have this in my current contract).
But what alerts me, there is also a requirement to run dehumidifiers, and keep humidity below 60%. I see such a kind of clause the first time. And moreover, there are at least 2 dehumidifiers at the property(which wasn't mentioned by a landlord or unfortunately noticed by me).

Is this a common thing to have such clauses in contracts, dehumidifier in old houses, or is it something that should alert me and hint into reconsidering this property for rent?

Thank you for any input and advice
Global Moderator
Hero Member
Posts: 1351

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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2021, 09:56:37 AM »

There is no way anyone could enforce a clause about usage of dehumidifiers and humidity levels.I would guess they have had problems before with tenants allowing mould to flourish,and they want to emphasise the need for vigilance.I placed a dehumidifier in one property after some tenants were very negligent.None of the subsequent tenants have had to use it because they act responsibly.If you really like the place and are prepared to look after it,I would not let this put you off.You could ask to have the clause removed if it bothers you,but you could be grateful to have access to the dehumidifiers come winter. 
Newbie
Posts: 8

I like property

« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2021, 11:19:56 PM »

I wouldn't sign a lease that wants me to run dehumidifiers, the landlord needs to fix their building (at probably great expense but too bad) so it is better insulated ,it is a major warning flag that there are problems with the building that could lead to allergies/sickness.

also dehumidifiers can be noisy so not practical to run all the time, you'd need one for every room almost and running one in bedroom 24/7 is far from practical. not to mention the electricity cost which maybe you could even try and claim from landlord somehow.

I would recommend going online where you can search for the EPC rating of the property and see what areas the landlord needs to fix to see how bad it is. I've learnt recently a landlord can lease out even if the EPC is in bad shape but this will be increased in 2025 to mean they must do more. good luck, in my mind there is always another property around the corner.

https://find-energy-certificate.digital.communities.gov.uk/find-a-certificate/search-by-postcode
« Last Edit: July 17, 2021, 11:22:16 PM by tenant123 »
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« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2021, 11:26:07 AM »

There's too many assumptions here.

Firstly, yes it is quite an odd clause - not common. So do be wary. However, it might not mean you can infer there's anything fundamentally wrong with the property. The Landlord could have inserted this clause into the agreement after having a bad experience with a previous Tenant... so it could be a hangover. There are many times that Tenants complain about mould and / or condensation and they themselves are the root cause... it is quite often "a lifestyle thing". I am not making that assumption here, of course. I am just pointing out that there's not enough information to go on. And I'm confirming that the clause is uncommon... though it wouldn't be unexpected to see something more general like giving a Tenant responsibility to protect the property from things like frost damage or condensation. I think the general conclusion I would arrive at is to ask about it before signing.
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