Forum Home Search Login Register
+  Landlord Forum
|-+  General Category
| |-+  Tenant Advice & Help
| | |-+  Need to leave the country (potentially) and don't have a break clause

Need to leave the country (potentially) and don't have a break clause

Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: Need to leave the country (potentially) and don't have a break clause  (Read 75 times)
Newbie
Posts: 2

I like property

« on: January 03, 2021, 10:03:46 PM »

Hi There,

My name is Ricardo and I'm from Argentina. I'm currently living in the UK under a Tier 2 Visa. This means that I can live legally in the country as long as I keep my job. The problem is that my current company is under an economic turmoil and will probably lay out a lot of employees (that happened last month). This means I can potentially lose my job and if I don't find another one quickly I'll be deported (It cannot be any job, as it It needs to be able to sponsor a Visa, so I have less options).

My problem is that two months ago I moved to a new place and signed a 12 month contract without a break clause. I now understand how stupid that decision was, but in my defence I didn't knew about the problems the company was facing.

The thing is that if I need to leave the UK and return to Argentina I won't be able to keep paying the rent. Not that I don't want to, but the average wage there is something like 300 a month (I work in tech so I will probably earn something close to 900), so it will be impossible for me to pay my current 1500 rent from there. I also have very little savings.

If the worse happens and I lose my job and don't find another one quickly, I don't want to be an asshole with the landlord and leave without notice, but I want to know what my options are. I'm really under a lot of stress right now and it will help me to know what would be the worse case scenario if I break the contract.

Thanks in advance,
Ricardo
« Last Edit: January 03, 2021, 10:07:51 PM by ricardo92 »
Full Member
Posts: 105

I like property

« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2021, 11:24:52 PM »

Really difficult one.  I really appreciate the fact that you want to do the right thing.

My advice would be to speak to your landlord and explain the situation. If your landlord is decent they will at least appreciate the heads up to a potential issue.
Global Moderator
Hero Member
Posts: 3780

I like lots of things

« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2021, 12:31:50 PM »

I agree with the advice about opening up a line of communication with your Landlord. At the moment you are not talking about a plan, but a risk of something happening that you should both prepare for, as best you can. No Landlord wants a person in their property who isn't paying rent - that is the worst outcome and that is not being discussed here. So there's that positive. What we are talking about is either things continuing as normal or the chance that you will need to end the tenancy and the Landlord needs to find a new Tenant to replace you... and there being no published mechanism in your agreement for that... this is why you should make your Landlord aware... not because they will take pre-emptive action, but so they are aware of the risk. They might have options for you. You don't need to beg. You don't need to expend massive amounts of energy preparing for the worst case. Your Landlord may come back and say - "thank you, let's see what happens, but if the Home Office are saying you have to leave the country then there is very little I can do to make you pay the remainder of the rent, especially from a foreign land - I don't like it, but I have to accept the realities of the situation" - but if they try to bully you or come back with something unreasonable come back to tell us how that conversation goes and we will advise further... possibly not with total legal positions, but with ways on how to handle the conversation best.
Newbie
Posts: 2

I like property

« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2021, 03:04:55 PM »

Thanks! I will talk with the Landlord (in fact, my Landlord is a company, so it's more difficult, but I will try to do it). Sorry for thinking the worst, but what happens if the landlord goes to court and I'm obliged to pay the totality of the rent despite not having how to do it? How would they enforce that?

Thanks for your responses, I'll update here :)
Full Member
Posts: 105

I like property

« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2021, 03:08:43 PM »

Thanks! I will talk with the Landlord (in fact, my Landlord is a company, so it's more difficult, but I will try to do it). Sorry for thinking the worst, but what happens if the landlord goes to court and I'm obliged to pay the totality of the rent despite not having how to do it? How would they enforce that?

Thanks for your responses, I'll update here :)
If you go abroad getting you to pay the rent will be extremely difficult.  It is likely that you will lose your deposit.

Pages: [1]
Print