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Landlord not happy with standard of the professional cleaning company we hired

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« on: October 20, 2021, 04:49:04 PM »

We hired a professional cleaner to clean the property as an End of Tenancy Clean including carpets (unfurnished). We were happy with the state the cleaners had left the property in, after all we have a different view to a Landlord. We then let the Landlord know the next day, both hard copy and email including a receipt. The landlord completed their inspection 3 days later (well a colleague of his did) and then sent the email a further 3 days after that, so totalling 7 days post clean. He states the cleaning we did was not up to his standard nor does it match the inventory, with lots of photos of things unclean. There痴 all the focus on unclean rather than actually ticking off the inventory. He proposes two options; we clean it ourselves or he hires a cleaning company and recoups the costs via the TDS.

We致e acknowledged receipt of the email and that痴 it currently, we致e not responded to any queries or demands. We are not happy with either option as we do not feel we need to do either, we have gone above and beyond by hiring a professional cleaning company as landlords cannot actually include that in their contract anymore. We have requested a copy in the Check In Inventory (the one signed and commented on by ourselves), we have a copy of the unsigned one.

We致e been renting at this particular property for coming up to 7 years. The first two years was through an Agency as an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (for two years), they have no photos to go with the Check In Inventory as they致e changed their system. Our Landlord took over from them privately (4 years), just copied their contract, so it became a Periodic Tenancy, no photos of the place when he took over. We致e not had any inspection from him in over three years.

We have bought a house and as soon as we knew it was all proceeding to exchange, we gave our one month notice, with dates of when we would be moving most of our smaller items (more presentable) and our larger furniture, then the final handing the keys back (day after the professional clean). Keys posted back through letterbox. We kept him informed of progress, giving him the opportunity to carry out inspections. We let him know the name of the company so he could check them online. He did not visit prior to the clean, his colleague (not a landlord) went to the property after we had moved out and posted the keys back through so we were not present, he then took his time to send a reply. The cleaning company had he looked actually says on their site that if the Landlord is not happy, providing he has done an inspection and let them know within 72 hours of the clean, they will come back to address particular areas of concern. We are in contact with the cleaning company to obtain a full breakdown of cleaning including what may not have been cleaned and why. For example we know the wall paint is waterbased so any attempt at cleaning takes the paint off.

Furthermore he states that he is having building work done to the whole property, but then says the cleanliness is not up to his standard for renting out. That conflicts each other as building work will require a clean after. He値l need to do work on the place before it痴 rented out as it needs updating.

Questions we have:
Our Landlord we think should have carried out a new Check In Inventory with photos when he took over surely?
Should our Landlord have carried our regular inspections?
Can he make us clean the property again? Or hire another company and charge us through TDS?
What can we do?

We池e thinking that if there痴 no check In photographs anywhere and that we used a professional company that will go in our favour. Also that we致e been there for 7 years, nothing was new when we moved in; kitchen, carpets, bathroom, wall paint, ceiling paint.
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« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2021, 06:36:46 PM »

Call his bluff... point out there are no before photos, only after... therefore no comparison exists. Advise him to take it through the ADR process (Deposit Dispute) of the particular Deposit Scheme in question. Tell him that you realise the onus to provide evidence will be solely on him (which he cannot do). Advise him that you already know the outcome of a Dispute, but he can waste his time if he wants. Tell him that, as there are no photos of before, for everything he raises you'll just say "it was worse than that at the beginning of the tenancy" (don't put anything in writing that you are faking this, even if you are, or are not)... just state it as fact / genuine opinion. Say the first thing you did 7 years ago was take your own photos and you've now had time to review them - the place is now in a better state of cleanliness than it was before (but don't offer these to be evidence).

Above all, have some fun with this... unless you're in desperate need for the Deposit back. Let him spin his wheels a little bit.

The thing about clean is simply this... there is no objective scale. To a normal person there is obviously something that is clean and something that is unclean... but then there's other people who aren't normal (what is normal?) and will gravitate towards the other two extremes... one person might say a room is clean and another firmly says it's filthy... there's simply no objective and agreed-upon scale of cleanliness that exists... or ever can exist... e.g. 0 to 10.
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« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2021, 08:50:39 PM »

I have 2 flats being vacated,and have decided to have them both fully refurbished. I wrote to each tenant telling them to leave the gardens tidy, clean the ovens and fridges,and not bother with cleaning as everything is being ripped out.Why is your landlord nitpicking when he's got the builders booked? I would not give in to this nonsense.
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« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2021, 10:12:57 PM »

The important questions here:

Was there an inventory check-in done by a 3rd party? If so, did it state the property was cleaned to a professional standard?
Was the checkout done by a 3rd party? What was the overall status of the cleaning on the report?

You are wrong on two points. One that a professional clean cannot be stated in a contract anymore.  If a 3rd party report deems the property cleaned to a professional standard at the check-in and all is above board then the tenant is responsible for returning the clean to the same standard. 2nd point you are wrong on is the cleaning company being allowed to return.  They might have it in their terms and conditions but no landlord or agent has to let a 3rd party contractor into the property once the tenancy has ended.

Argue your points based on the check-in, checkout and tenancy agreement. If the landlord will not bend raise a deposit dispute. It's free and you likely have a strong case.

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« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2021, 10:10:34 AM »

2nd point you are wrong on is the cleaning company being allowed to return.  They might have it in their terms and conditions but no landlord or agent has to let a 3rd party contractor into the property once the tenancy has ended.

I think the cleaning company has a term saying they're willing to revisit. Not that they must be allowed to. Anyway, their term is also "within 72 hours" so that ship has sailed over the horizon by another 72 hours.
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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2021, 10:41:28 AM »

You are wrong on two points. One that a professional clean cannot be stated in a contract anymore.  If a 3rd party report deems the property cleaned to a professional standard at the check-in and all is above board then the tenant is responsible for returning the clean to the same standard.

You can stipulate that the property should be to a certain standard of cleanliness ("professional", whatever that means in this context). You can't stipulate how that is to be achieved.
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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2021, 10:55:33 AM »

An update:

Landlord has no photos from the start of the tenancy
Landlord has an incomplete inventory; only has the start of tenancy (with agent) one, so is basing everything on that
Landlord has no written information for inspections; nor has he done any in years.

We値l contact the cleaning company we hired to see if they can come back to look at / explain to the Landlord why certain areas are not / cannot be done for example steam cleaning walls and ceilings when the paint is waterbased. Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.
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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2021, 11:18:23 AM »

Was there an inventory check-in done by a 3rd party? If so, did it state the property was cleaned to a professional standard?
Was the checkout done by a 3rd party? What was the overall status of the cleaning on the report?

Inventory check in carried out by the rental agency at the very start as our contract was with them. Only states cleaned carpets to a professional standard, all the rest of the property is "clean", "adequate" or "good condition". It seems to alternate between clean and condition which confuses wear and tear with cleanliness, we feel. After two years our landlord took it over, a new contract was written with himself.
The landlord did not update the inventory at the two year takeover mark, nor had regular inspections nor had a 3rd party inspect it.
Can we as tenants consider a new tenancy with him as a start again sort of thing so he has to do all the check in things again?
Whom is responsible for updating the inventory? Including state of the place as he's saying that when he took over we hadn't signed it (we were waiting for him to update it at the next inspection which he didn't do), we'd of course signed the contract.
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2021, 11:20:29 AM »

Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.

Why?

Why are you rolling over and having your belly-tickled like this? You appear to have done nothing wrong. Your ex-Landlord's position (the knowledge of building work) seems unreasonable and money-grabbing. You are in a position of strength. There is no evidence that can be called-upon to validate his assertions. I would leave the Cleaning Company out of it and tell the Landlord you'd like to progress down the route of ADR with the Deposit Scheme in question. Let them think on that for a bit...

I guarantee it will be a lot of extra effort for the Landlord. The onus will be on them to provide evidence, which they simply do not have. All your position really needs to be is - "it was in a worse condition when we moved in" - if anyone asks you to prove it, then it's not your responsibility to do that - it's the ex-Landlord's responsibility - and they cannot perform this.

I don't understand this meekness.
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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2021, 11:22:43 AM »

Was there an inventory check-in done by a 3rd party? If so, did it state the property was cleaned to a professional standard?
Was the checkout done by a 3rd party? What was the overall status of the cleaning on the report?

Inventory check in carried out by the rental agency at the very start as our contract was with them. Only states cleaned carpets to a professional standard, all the rest of the property is "clean", "adequate" or "good condition". It seems to alternate between clean and condition which confuses wear and tear with cleanliness, we feel. After two years our landlord took it over, a new contract was written with himself.
The landlord did not update the inventory at the two year takeover mark, nor had regular inspections nor had a 3rd party inspect it.
Can we as tenants consider a new tenancy with him as a start again sort of thing so he has to do all the check in things again?
Whom is responsible for updating the inventory? Including state of the place as he's saying that when he took over we hadn't signed it (we were waiting for him to update it at the next inspection which he didn't do), we'd of course signed the contract.

I feel you are complicating matters unnecessarily. My personal view is that you need to learn the power of "no". I cannot guarantee success, but it feels like the Landlord is trying to pull a fast one.
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2021, 11:25:41 AM »

Call his bluff... point out there are no before photos, only after... therefore no comparison exists.

We're concerned that he can use the very first check in inventory from the start of the tenancy (with the agent) which he hasn't updated, it has no photos though. Can he still use that?

He's saying we didn't sign the check in inventory from when he took over (2 years later); he hadn't updated it with his report so we were waiting for him to update before we signed it - it was an exact copy of the agent's one. We of course signed the contract. Does that mean it'll default to the agents check? He seems to think it does.
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« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2021, 11:28:04 AM »

I feel you are complicating matters unnecessarily. My personal view is that you need to learn the power of "no". I cannot guarantee success, but it feels like the Landlord is trying to pull a fast one.

Yes true!
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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2021, 11:32:38 AM »

Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.

Why?

Why are you rolling over and having your belly-tickled like this? You appear to have done nothing wrong. Your ex-Landlord's position (the knowledge of building work) seems unreasonable and money-grabbing. You are in a position of strength. There is no evidence that can be called-upon to validate his assertions. I would leave the Cleaning Company out of it and tell the Landlord you'd like to progress down the route of ADR with the Deposit Scheme in question. Let them think on that for a bit...

I guarantee it will be a lot of extra effort for the Landlord. The onus will be on them to provide evidence, which they simply do not have. All your position really needs to be is - "it was in a worse condition when we moved in" - if anyone asks you to prove it, then it's not your responsibility to do that - it's the ex-Landlord's responsibility - and they cannot perform this.

I don't understand this meekness.

It's not meekness, it's frustration and just wanting to move on with our life in our new home!

I guess we're trying to take the easy route rather than actually aiming to get our deposit back - clarity on our direction helps, thanks :)

I think we're worried he's going to pull a rabbit out of the hat so to speak - you'll say don't worry about that at this moment.
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« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2021, 11:36:33 AM »

It's OK to want an easy life, I get that... sometimes you pay for that luxury... and, if that's the case that you just want to move on, why not just let him deduct an[y] amount from your Deposit (as per his 'offer' in your first post) and then you can move on in the simplest way possible? There's obviously some fight within you... otherwise you'd not be here... but I'm not saying fight everything, and incur delays and frustration and all that... but, decide, if you do really want the easy, simple solution - it's in front of you.

What is the 」 amount we are talking about here?
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« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2021, 11:38:16 AM »

Call his bluff... point out there are no before photos, only after... therefore no comparison exists.

...it has no photos though. Can he still use that?

Sure... but what value does it have? None at all. I feel like it's almost something I'd encourage him to use in any formal Dispute... they'd laugh him straight out, surely?
« Last Edit: October 21, 2021, 11:44:35 AM by Hippogriff »
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« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2021, 11:48:39 AM »

It's OK to want an easy life, I get that... sometimes you pay for that luxury... and, if that's the case that you just want to move on, why not just let him deduct an[y] amount from your Deposit (as per his 'offer' in your first post) and then you can move on in the simplest way possible? There's obviously some fight within you... otherwise you'd not be here... but I'm not saying fight everything, and incur delays and frustration and all that... but, decide, if you do really want the easy, simple solution - it's in front of you.

What is the 」 amount we are talking about here?

I'm happy to be in the back and forth stating our case for the long haul, I'm just wondering how difficult he's going to make it for us. I've had disputes before with previous tenancies, but over logical (sort of) things:
The fitting of new carpet, carpet was 10+ years old before we moved in, so goes with betterment
Scuffing on the stair walls - we had photos to prove it was there when we moved in.

We've not had something like cleanliness ever come up so it's new territory.

Deposit held with TDS is 」700 something, I need to check, so it's not a small amount.

Would it be better us raise a claim through TDS first (if we can start it) rather than wait for him to file one? When can he start to do that?
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« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2021, 12:01:00 PM »

No, I mean... what's the amount he's suggesting he'd retain to engage his own cleaning company... it's not 」700-something, obviously?
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« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2021, 12:13:04 PM »

No, I mean... what's the amount he's suggesting he'd retain to engage his own cleaning company... it's not 」700-something, obviously?

No idea, as he's speculating at the moment.

Our professional cleaning was about 」350, that's for an End of Tenancy clean, of a 2 bed terrace house, with one living room / diner, kitchen and oven, one bathroom, includes floors and outside of windows. He's challenging the cleanliness of walls and ceiling possibly throughout, bathroom tiles, and windowsills (2 rooms). Walls and ceiling are water based paint so cannot be cleaned (mostly ghosting as no extractor in bathroom or kitchen -no mould as dehumidifiers used, ceiling is also that pointy artex paint) bathroom tiles, over 7 years old so if cleaned professionally it'll need new grouting, windowsills (he's used matt over oil based, so it scuffs easily and flakes). it's going to be less than 」350.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2021, 12:20:23 PM by farahziya »
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« Reply #18 on: October 21, 2021, 12:33:15 PM »

If you've already laid-out 」350 for cleaning I'd be suggesting to the ex-Landlord you'd be willing to pay 」0 on top.

I think I'd probably try an email something like this:

Dear ex-Landlord,

I am writing to clarify our position on the cleaning aspect of the Deposit you currently still hold for our recently-ended tenancy. As you are aware we engaged a professional cleaning company at a cost of 」350 and we have provided you with the receipt for that. We were happy with the standard of cleaning. You obviously are not. For the avoidance of doubt - we are not willing to pay for any further cleaning. When a dispute like this arises it is probably best that we now move towards using the Alternative Dispute Resolution process that is outlined by the [insert Scheme name]. This will be a wholly impartial and completely evidence-based process. The onus is on the Landlord to provide evidence to justify the proposed deduction.

We have taken advice on this and, as there are no dated photographs from the start of the tenancy, it is our understanding that you will be unable to provide any evidence to support your position, therefore your claim will not be successful and we will be awarded the Deposit in full. In the meantime, while the disputed amount for cleaning is assessed, the Deposit Scheme will require that you return any of the Deposit amount that is not disputed. At the moment we do not even understand the amount you are disputing for cleaning as you've not provided us with any details, so you will need to do that first and foremost. Furthermore, our evidence will include our knowledge of your stated plans to conduct building work on the entirety of the property - therefore effectively rendering cleaning immaterial - and therefore, also taking into account 7 years of wear-and-tear, our confidence in a successful outcome is at its highest.

Alternatively, if you would prefer to just return our Deposit in full, without going through the [Deposit Scheme name] ADR process, then we would readily welcome that and everyone can just move on with no hard feelings. Can you please get back to us with your decision by the end of the week and then we will either then stand down or initiate the ADR process with [insert Scheme name] and we can trust in the process to be fair and equitable to both parties?
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« Reply #19 on: October 21, 2021, 12:39:06 PM »

If you've already laid-out 」350 for cleaning I'd be suggesting to the ex-Landlord you'd be willing to pay 」0 on top.

I think I'd probably try an email something like this:

Dear ex-Landlord,

I am writing to clarify our position on the cleaning aspect of the Deposit you currently still hold for our recently-ended tenancy. As you are aware we engaged a professional cleaning company at a cost of 」350 and we have provided you with the receipt for that. We were happy with the standard of cleaning. You obviously are not. For the avoidance of doubt - we are not willing to pay for any further cleaning. When a dispute like this arises it is probably best that we now move towards using the Alternative Dispute Resolution process that is outlined by the [insert Scheme name]. This will be a wholly impartial and completely evidence-based process. The onus is on the Landlord to provide evidence to justify the proposed deduction.

We have taken advice on this and, as there are no dated photographs from the start of the tenancy, it is our understanding that you will be unable to provide any evidence to support your position, therefore your claim will not be successful and we will be awarded the Deposit in full. In the meantime, while the disputed amount for cleaning is assessed, the Deposit Scheme will require that you return any of the Deposit amount that is not disputed. At the moment we do not even understand the amount you are disputing for cleaning as you've not provided us with any details, so you will need to do that first and foremost. Furthermore, our evidence will include our knowledge of your stated plans to conduct building work on the entirety of the property - therefore effectively rendering cleaning immaterial - and therefore, also taking into account 7 years of wear-and-tear, our confidence in a successful outcome is at its highest.

Alternatively, if you would prefer to just return our Deposit in full, without going through the [Deposit Scheme name] ADR process, then we would readily welcome that and everyone can just move on with no hard feelings. Can you please get back to us with your decision by the end of the week and then we will either then stand down or initiate the ADR process with [insert Scheme name] and we can trust in the process to be fair and equitable to both parties?


I like that email, a lot more direct than I would go for but it is good and clear.

Good point about the timestamped photos, I think most people forget that, I did until you mentioned it.

I shall amend and send, and will let you know the outcome. It'll be this evening most likely.
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« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2021, 01:05:17 PM »

Sometimes it's all about bluff and bravado... on your part (whether it's justified or not)... what you actually want here (and it's not guaranteed) is for the ex-Landlord to conclude: "I can't be arsed with this." or maybe they'll come back and suggest 」50 or something and you'll just say: "Sure, let's do it."
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« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2021, 01:09:38 PM »

2nd point you are wrong on is the cleaning company being allowed to return.  They might have it in their terms and conditions but no landlord or agent has to let a 3rd party contractor into the property once the tenancy has ended.

I think the cleaning company has a term saying they're willing to revisit. Not that they must be allowed to. Anyway, their term is also "within 72 hours" so that ship has sailed over the horizon by another 72 hours.

True. The agreement from the cleaner is between the cleaner and the tenant. It's a bit of a wasted term as the landlord or agent is not obliged to let the cleaner return and who is liable for the inventory clerk to return to confirm the level of clean?
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« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2021, 01:10:18 PM »

You are wrong on two points. One that a professional clean cannot be stated in a contract anymore.  If a 3rd party report deems the property cleaned to a professional standard at the check-in and all is above board then the tenant is responsible for returning the clean to the same standard.

You can stipulate that the property should be to a certain standard of cleanliness ("professional", whatever that means in this context). You can't stipulate how that is to be achieved.
True, which is what I said.
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« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2021, 01:11:59 PM »

2nd point you are wrong on is the cleaning company being allowed to return.  They might have it in their terms and conditions but no landlord or agent has to let a 3rd party contractor into the property once the tenancy has ended.

I think the cleaning company has a term saying they're willing to revisit. Not that they must be allowed to. Anyway, their term is also "within 72 hours" so that ship has sailed over the horizon by another 72 hours.

True. The agreement from the cleaner is between the cleaner and the tenant. It's a bit of a wasted term as the landlord or agent is not obliged to let the cleaner return and who is liable for the inventory clerk to return to confirm the level of clean?

I agree, crazy thing is that it wasn't even the Landlord himself whom did the check out inventory, it was his partner, so that could be biased in itself, surely not?! She hasn't been involved in anything until about two years ago.
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« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2021, 01:13:18 PM »

An update:

Landlord has no photos from the start of the tenancy
Landlord has an incomplete inventory; only has the start of tenancy (with agent) one, so is basing everything on that
Landlord has no written information for inspections; nor has he done any in years.

We値l contact the cleaning company we hired to see if they can come back to look at / explain to the Landlord why certain areas are not / cannot be done for example steam cleaning walls and ceilings when the paint is waterbased. Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.


The inventory is at the beginning of the tenancy and the deposit is affected by the condition compared at the end.

Cleaning is not confirmed by photos but by words. Inspections are irrelevant.

Getting written confirmation by the cleaner is not a bad idea in case this does go to dispute but probably isn't needed here.
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« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2021, 01:17:05 PM »

2nd point you are wrong on is the cleaning company being allowed to return.  They might have it in their terms and conditions but no landlord or agent has to let a 3rd party contractor into the property once the tenancy has ended.

I think the cleaning company has a term saying they're willing to revisit. Not that they must be allowed to. Anyway, their term is also "within 72 hours" so that ship has sailed over the horizon by another 72 hours.

True. The agreement from the cleaner is between the cleaner and the tenant. It's a bit of a wasted term as the landlord or agent is not obliged to let the cleaner return and who is liable for the inventory clerk to return to confirm the level of clean?

I agree, crazy thing is that it wasn't even the Landlord himself whom did the check out inventory, it was his partner, so that could be biased in itself, surely not?! She hasn't been involved in anything until about two years ago.
Everything is on your side here.  Just write a clear, direct email, like Hippogriff's above, and ask for the full deposit back.  If no joy, just raise a dispute.

The landlord is trying it on and not playing by the rules themselves.
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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2021, 01:17:23 PM »

Getting written confirmation by the cleaner is not a bad idea in case this does go to dispute but probably isn't needed here.

This is what I'm hoping... if the OP goes in strong, the ex-Landlord might just capitulate and escalation can be avoided either through that capitulation or a last-gasp 'offer' from the ex-Landlord the OP jumps at.
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« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2021, 01:19:37 PM »

An update:

Landlord has no photos from the start of the tenancy
Landlord has an incomplete inventory; only has the start of tenancy (with agent) one, so is basing everything on that
Landlord has no written information for inspections; nor has he done any in years.

We値l contact the cleaning company we hired to see if they can come back to look at / explain to the Landlord why certain areas are not / cannot be done for example steam cleaning walls and ceilings when the paint is waterbased. Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.


The inventory is at the beginning of the tenancy and the deposit is affected by the condition compared at the end.

Cleaning is not confirmed by photos but by words. Inspections are irrelevant.

Getting written confirmation by the cleaner is not a bad idea in case this does go to dispute but probably isn't needed here.

Beginning of tenancy meaning with him or further back with the agent?

Everything states timestampted photos are a must for before / after when researching into the dispute system.

Doesn't condition related to wear and tear or damage rather than cleanliness? As in something could be clean but in poor condition. When we talk about condition in normal context we mean damage.
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« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2021, 01:59:43 PM »

An update:

Landlord has no photos from the start of the tenancy
Landlord has an incomplete inventory; only has the start of tenancy (with agent) one, so is basing everything on that
Landlord has no written information for inspections; nor has he done any in years.

We値l contact the cleaning company we hired to see if they can come back to look at / explain to the Landlord why certain areas are not / cannot be done for example steam cleaning walls and ceilings when the paint is waterbased. Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.


The inventory is at the beginning of the tenancy and the deposit is affected by the condition compared at the end.

Cleaning is not confirmed by photos but by words. Inspections are irrelevant.

Getting written confirmation by the cleaner is not a bad idea in case this does go to dispute but probably isn't needed here.

Beginning of tenancy meaning with him or further back with the agent?

Everything states timestampted photos are a must for before / after when researching into the dispute system.

Doesn't condition related to wear and tear or damage rather than cleanliness? As in something could be clean but in poor condition. When we talk about condition in normal context we mean damage.
Beginning of the tenancy is when you moved in and had your original tenancy agreement. The landlord taking over management is just that. New management, not a new tenancy.

Time stamped photos are for damages, not for cleaning.

As your only dispute appears to be cleaning and your original inventory only states the flooring was professionally cleaned I think you're in the clear here.
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« Reply #29 on: October 21, 2021, 02:11:13 PM »

An update:

Landlord has no photos from the start of the tenancy
Landlord has an incomplete inventory; only has the start of tenancy (with agent) one, so is basing everything on that
Landlord has no written information for inspections; nor has he done any in years.

We値l contact the cleaning company we hired to see if they can come back to look at / explain to the Landlord why certain areas are not / cannot be done for example steam cleaning walls and ceilings when the paint is waterbased. Hopefully they値l do a reduced rate and the Landlord can be present. We値l just have to pay the cost.


The inventory is at the beginning of the tenancy and the deposit is affected by the condition compared at the end.

Cleaning is not confirmed by photos but by words. Inspections are irrelevant.

Getting written confirmation by the cleaner is not a bad idea in case this does go to dispute but probably isn't needed here.

Beginning of tenancy meaning with him or further back with the agent?

Everything states timestampted photos are a must for before / after when researching into the dispute system.

Doesn't condition related to wear and tear or damage rather than cleanliness? As in something could be clean but in poor condition. When we talk about condition in normal context we mean damage.
Beginning of the tenancy is when you moved in and had your original tenancy agreement. The landlord taking over management is just that. New management, not a new tenancy.

Time stamped photos are for damages, not for cleaning.

As your only dispute appears to be cleaning and your original inventory only states the flooring was professionally cleaned I think you're in the clear here.

Thanks for clarifying :)
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