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Landlord / Agency doesn't want to let the contract go a rolling on contract.

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Author Topic: Landlord / Agency doesn't want to let the contract go a rolling on contract.  (Read 183 times)
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« on: December 21, 2020, 06:23:10 PM »

Hi everyone , I'm here to ask for a bit of advice regarding my situation , please excuse me if my grammar isn't right , not English native.

I'm approaching the end of the agreement in January (it`s actually one month extension of the agreement that ends at the end of December ) and at the last conversations that we've had at the end of November about switching to a rolling on contract , they (the agency) made it clear they "don't do rolling contracts". As I understand and as some friends told me , by law the contract has to go on a monthly one at the end , and I have to give them one month of notice before I intend to leave.

Can someone please instruct me how should I proceed and what to tell the agency.
If it matters they've never had a issue with me , the rent is paid monthly on the 1st and it has always been paid on time. Have been renting with them since February 2020 , been renting since 2014 overall.

The reason I want it to go on a rolling on contract is that my job security is practically nonexistent and I expect a redundancy letter soon.

Thank you!
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« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2020, 07:11:21 PM »

The agency is trying to mislead you.Maybe to get a fee from you for signing another agreement ? Whatever, you don't have to take any action until you need to hand your notice in.Good luck in finding another job soon.
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« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2020, 07:13:10 PM »

Assuming you have a assured tenancy (shorthold or otherwise), then you already have the answer. It's doesn't matter what the landlord or their agent think they do or do not do. At the end of a fixed term, if you're still living there, a periodic tenancy will arise pursuant to section 5 of the Housing Act 1988. Nothing the landlord can say or do could prevent otherwise. It's entirely done to whether you're still living there come fixed term tenancy ends.
Newbie
Posts: 13

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« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2020, 05:21:33 AM »

And with coronavirus they are not getting you out any time soon - arrears or not.

Personally I would run up rent arrears - save the money - if you get made redundant then claim benefits including housing benefit - take it from there.

No way you should be worrying about losing your home during this pandemic - agents and landlords will do what is in their interest but you must look after yourself not them.

You would be homeless if you lose this tenancy and in the current climate it isnt going to be easy to get a new home never mind if you are also unemployed.
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« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2020, 05:44:00 PM »

Pray why are you suggesting that the tenant deliberately gets into arrears,causing financial loss to the landlord and getting the tenant a bad credit rating/CCJ. Then again,perhaps you think all landlords are fat cats who have inherited money,and a CCJ is some kind of badge of honour?
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2020, 10:17:59 AM »

...they (the agency) made it clear they "don't do rolling contracts".

Clarifying the English aspect of this only... it's factually correct, 100%. No-one 'does' rolling contracts if you think about it... because it's a thing that doesn't exactly exist, right? You have a fixed term AST / contract and then it reaches the end... and a rolling contract automatically arises without a) anyone needing to do anything specific to make it happen, and b) anyone being able to stop it (beyond the signing of a new fixed term contract, or the tenancy ending).

So... an Agency "not doing rolling contracts" is fine, in the English sense... but that's not actually particular to them. It's true of everyone. No-one 'does' rolling contracts... they simply are.
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