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External insulation

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Author Topic: External insulation  (Read 195 times)
Newbie
Posts: 2

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« on: September 17, 2019, 04:19:28 PM »

Hi all, I am a tenant in a private property.I received a letter from my local council and gas company telling me my four in a block house would be eligible to have external insulation fitted for heating the house and that I should tell my letting agent. I as the rent paying tenant donít want this as I will cause me lots of aggravation and upheaval. Months of workman putting up scaffolding, walking outside my windows, hammering and drilling which will keep my baby up all day.
Please advise me on A) whether I can refuse this and B) do I have to inform the letting agent/landlord of this offer by the council. Thanks in advance.
Hero Member
Posts: 738

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« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2019, 04:38:09 PM »

You need to check what type of insulation this is.Does the letter say it will take months ? I have not heard of any kind that would involve the disruption you describe.I had one of my rentals done,and it was completed in a day.It should reduce your heating bills.As you are not the owner you cannot refuse this as far as I know,and in any case the other 3 tenants would have the right to comment.They will presumably have had the same letter.The agent  and landlord may well know of this scheme already. 
Newbie
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« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2019, 05:04:25 PM »

Thanks for the reply. The building up the road is having the work done just now and it started 3rd of August and itís still going strong. Scaffolding has surrounded the building all the time, with residents unable to open their blinds without workmen staring in their windows, never mind being able to open their windows to let air in. This sort of disruption isnít essential work so I donít believe I should be forced to suffer this.
As for the other residents, one owns their house, one lives in their mother house who is in residence home and the 3rd is a private renter
« Last Edit: September 17, 2019, 05:06:02 PM by Annrkey »
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2019, 11:48:18 AM »

Oh that does sound disruptive.If the work is not essential or a legal requirement demanded by the council,then I think you could object.Tenants have the right to something called "Quiet enjoyment",and this work sounds neither quiet or enjoyable.I don't think you are obliged to pass on the letter,so in your position I would keep schtum and hope for the best.
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2019, 12:28:28 PM »

There's probably no harm in passing it on anyway as unless it's very cheap and/or your current EPC rating is so low that they'll be forced to do something about it anyway, there's not a lot in it for them. I've looked at it for my own home and the cost/benefit is marginal. It'll increase the value of the property slightly but I doubt it would significantly increase the rentability.  The biggest beneficiary would be you, the tenant, getting your winter heating bills substantially reduced.

As Heavykarma says, you have a right to quite enjoyment of the property so, if the landlord actually was keen to go ahead, you could negotiate some form of compensation for the disruption, such as a discount on the rent while the works are ongoing.
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