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Tenant requests to take window out

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Author Topic: Tenant requests to take window out  (Read 149 times)
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« on: June 03, 2021, 11:09:32 PM »

I am a new landlord. Day 6 of new tenancy Tenant asks if they can take the entire front window out including frame to get their large new sofa in the front room after failing to check if it would fit first before ordering. Property is a period property with deep period panelled interior window ledge in immaculate condition. Do you think I am unfair saying no you cannot, even though Tenant states they will make good.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2021, 11:11:07 PM by ER »
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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2021, 03:12:04 AM »

They're likely to be long-term!

They asked, at least... it's not unheard of for Tenants to just do it. You might not like it (I wouldn't either)... but if it's made good what's the difference to you in the real world?
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« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2021, 12:37:14 PM »

Hippogriff is right.

They are likely to be long term.

Having invested in a - presumably expensive - sofa, they won't want to abandon it soon, or have to repeat the process of removing and replacing the window to get the sofa out again in the near future.

I'd ask them what they intend doing if/when they eventually end the rental. Take the window out and make good again?  They may not have thought this through and their answer may be revealing.

When a tenant rents your property, it's theirs to do with pretty much what they will, provided they return it to you in the same condition as when they moved in.

So it comes down to two things:

1. Do you have, or can you get, detailed photos of the condition of the window/frame/ledge before the work is done.

2. Is the tenant competent at the required task of removal and reinstatement of the window to the required standard?

If it's a "yes" to 1 and 2, then you should let them do it.  Consider what will happen to the tenancy and relationship if you say no to them now.

Remember also that you do have their deposit to offset against any remedial work needed when they leave.


And put everything in writing!
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2021, 01:56:00 PM »

I would refuse to have this done.They may feel that making good amounts to a bit of pollyfilla and a lick of paint. When they leave,have they said they will leave the sofa behind,or would they intend going through the same palaver again? They should change the sofa for a smaller one.I am not at all sure if their plans suggest longevity.I refused to let a couple put up  garish wallpaper in a freshly decorated house. Within a month of moving in,they split up and moved back to parents.
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« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2021, 02:37:28 PM »

It doesn't necessarily follow that they'll be long term tenants: if they didn't think about how they were going to get it in, it may not have occurred to them that they're going to have to get it out again in due course. I presume they ordered this thing before they'd even got the keys.

It's reasonable to refuse but I doubt you could practically enforce it if push came to pivot. What you don't want is them doing it anyway and causing a deposit's worth of damage before they're even a month into the tenancy. How about asking them to use (and pay for) a contractor of your choosing?
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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2021, 11:27:02 AM »

Thanks for the advice everyone some very good points in each reply. On this occasion I made my decision and have said no. Tenant purchased sofa before keys were collected without considering any measurements at all. Tenant said will attempt exchange for a smaller sofa or partial refund.
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2021, 12:16:33 PM »

It depends on the window.
My own is a large double glazed one and I paid a window firm nearby to pop out the plastic holders which allowed the whole pane to come out. My sofa then went through the empty window and then they popped the pane back in with the plastic holders. I paid them 30 as I was a bit worried doing it myself, but have since done it replacing smaller panes.
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« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2021, 05:04:53 PM »

It depends on the window.

"Period property" sounds like a frame job: one pane isn't going to be big enough, unless there's convenient modern window round the back. There is something oddly satisfying about popping a pane out though.  :)
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