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Joint tenancy, moral maze

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Author Topic: Joint tenancy, moral maze  (Read 121 times)
Newbie
Posts: 2

I like property

« on: April 24, 2022, 06:28:53 PM »

  Just here to vent this really!
4 years ago I let a very nice 2 bed to a young family. The father had a dependable and adequate income, the young mother was on maternity leave as they had a new baby. Rent paid, house looked after, documentation all in place, any repairs notified promptly made. No rent increases in 4 years. Everyone holding up their end of the bargain. Fast forwards 4 years. Dad requests to ‘come off the tenancy’ as he wants to find himself somewhere else to live as his girlfriend being unreasonable. He only wants to pay child maintenance going forwards. At first I thought lets be kind and draw up a new tenancy for the lady and child. I don’t warm to the lady but business is business. Then I begin to see she does not have the income on her own to pay the rent. How could I sleep at night taking money off this poor single parent? Isn’t it highly irresponsible to make someone sign a financial agreement that they cannot honour? So i refuse a new tenancy. I state emphatically that they either stick with the joint and severally liable tenancy or hand the house back in order  to end the tenancy. After all can I buy a cake, eat it and then take the wrapper back to the shop for a refund? Boyfriend actually suggests that I should give her notice! Whaaaat!? The jerk wants me to evict his own child? He wants me to punish his girlfriend for being unreasonable? I get to push babies out onto the street? WHoah! Shelter would have a field day! She also told me a lie so instant fail for me there. I have stated the following option 1: The tenancy continues as is, joint and severally liable or Option 2 the house is handed back and the tenancy ends. and told them to agree on which option and to get back to me.  He has now gone to see his solicitor, no doubt to see if the solicitor can make the girlfriend behave! Anyway at least a solicitor is better equipped to help him handle his ‘divorce’ than me. The boyfriend can also evict his own child if he wants to but don't see why I should evict babies!!!  I know its a risk and there are queues of people out there in my area crying out for property who would happily pay more than this pair. But I have always tried to be fair and principled but I tell you a section 21 is very very tempting with this lot!
Global Moderator
Hero Member
Posts: 1531

I like property

« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2022, 12:25:46 PM »

This is not an uncommon situation. I can understand that you feel bad about issuing 21,but it could come to that. You don't say how long ago this all blew up.If it is very recent they may get back together.If not,you need to decide whether you can let her stay there rent-free until such time as she decides to leave-which would probably mean no time soon.Don't beat yourself up if you have to take a harder line eventually.
Newbie
Posts: 2

I like property

« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2022, 03:38:16 PM »

Thanks for your reply. They are now talking to each other at least and considering family mediation. There are no arrears yet but of course if there were I would evict. She could then be put in a dingy b&b by the council! He earns good money and is going to continue to help her but wants to extricate himself so he can rent a place of his own. There is an incredible shortage of rental properties locally so maybe they will wake up soon from their Jeremy Kyle episode!
Accidental Landlord
Full Member
Posts: 112

Just trying my best

« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2022, 11:51:43 AM »

It is a difficult situation. I would be extremely careful about trying to help this family. You don't and can't know the details of their relationship so it's best to keep as clear of their dramas as possible. As you say business is business. I would give them as much notice as possible.
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