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Damaged goods

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Author Topic: Damaged goods  (Read 87 times)
Newbie
Posts: 3

I like property

« on: January 24, 2020, 11:49:31 PM »

I have been informed by our letting agent that one of our tenants has advised that a boiler grill has fallen from the wall from a height of approx approximately 10ft high and knocked her television over. which hs rendered it inoperable  The tenant has been a good tenant and been with us for two years so have no reason to disbelieve her.  The flat is let unfurnished and I am informed she has no contents insurance.  We only have insurance for building cover.  The TV does not appear to be a large screen TV and was on a stand on a unit.

Should I look at
1).replacing the tv for her
2) offering some money towards a new one
3) advise her nothing we can do as she should have insurance (Our letting agent is suggesting this option)
4) Anything other (please elaborate!)

Any recommendations gratefully received.
Global Moderator
Hero Member
Posts: 3320

I like lots of things

« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2020, 02:14:43 AM »

Always - without fail - ignore what a Letting Agent advises you. Go against it, for kicks.

Why do you need advice regarding morals? Yes, it's a business... we get that... a people business.

Morally-speaking... what do you really think? If you're looking for someone to tell you to go against the advice of the Agent, I think some of us here will be lining-up...
Accidental Landlord
Jr. Member
Posts: 70

Just trying my best

« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2020, 01:58:39 PM »

Hmm, I assume the boiler grill is a fixture so that might well be part of your building insurance? I mean it's not supposed to fall down is it so there was some failure of the device or mechanism and what if it had fallen on her or anyone else - then you would have to be covered by the Landlord limited liability insurance presumably? Anyway my point is that yes you could give zero but in the scheme of things, a small gesture now could be worth it if you have a good long term tenant. Maybe offer x amount towards her contents insurance (the tenancy agreement should state that tenants need to have one in place) and make it crystal clear that it is a one off gesture at your absolute discretion.
Hero Member
Posts: 784

I like property

« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2020, 06:06:18 PM »

You may well be able to get a sales bargain,or offer some money towards a new set. In my experience,very few single tenants take out insurance.A good tenant who pays rent on time is someone to treasure.I would feel morally obliged to make this right.
Newbie
Posts: 24

I like property

« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2020, 07:47:40 PM »

I don't think any building insurance will cover this damage.  There is generally an excess anyway which could be higher than the cost of the TV if it wasn't expensive and quite old.

I think this is more a customer service issue than a technical one.  A good tenant paying on time is something to cherish.  If something like this happens and the landlord offers a fair agreement to pay towards a new TV then you will have a happy tenant knowing they have a landlord who cares.
Global Moderator
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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2020, 10:45:38 AM »

Hmm, I assume the boiler grill is a fixture so that might well be part of your building insurance? I mean it's not supposed to fall down is it so there was some failure of the device or mechanism and what if it had fallen on her or anyone else - then you would have to be covered by the Landlord limited liability insurance presumably? Anyway my point is that yes you could give zero but in the scheme of things, a small gesture now could be worth it if you have a good long term tenant. Maybe offer x amount towards her contents insurance (the tenancy agreement should state that tenants need to have one in place) and make it crystal clear that it is a one off gesture at your absolute discretion.

I think this is good - interesting - advice. The Tenant's Contents were actually a casualty of something happening that should be covered by the Landlord's Building. I don't see how it could be fair that the Tenant is ever responsible here. I am not an Insurance expert... but I know that if my car is in my driveway, stationary, just sitting there, and someone drives into it I expect them to take full responsibility... I don't want to be claiming on my own insurance. That poor TV was just sitting there, minding its own business... like others have said, beyond the Insurance angle, I see this as a simple stand-up straight and serve your customer issue.

I would comment that the tenancy agreement can state a Tenant is responsible for their own Contents (more like stating the obvious, I suppose), but it cannot try to enforce that a Tenant takes out Contents Insurance.
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