Forum Home Search Login Register
+  Landlord Forum
|-+  General Category
| |-+  Landlord Advice & Help
| | |-+  Allowing pets

Allowing pets

Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: Allowing pets  (Read 106 times)
Newbie
Posts: 3

I like property

« on: January 25, 2020, 10:47:36 AM »

Morning All
Please be gentle, this is my first post. My brother and I have inherited half of my late mothers house and planning to buy out our two sisters and let the house for about 7 years. Then I will take over the house to live in. I would like to know people's advice/opinions on allowing pets(apart from dogs). Would this widen our appeal, increase chances of long term tennants and attract higher rental?
Thanks
Regards
Joe
Global Moderator
Sr. Member
Posts: 390

I like poetry

« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2020, 12:39:19 PM »

I allow pets (including dogs). A property that's set up for average tenants should be able to cope with the average pet. Just make it clear that pet damage is not normal wear and tear. You can't take an extra deposit these days because of the limits on the maximum total deposit but, if it means you get tenants that stay longer, you're quids in anyway.

I take it you've done your sums and decided renting the property out makes sense for you, rather than just selling up and putting the money in a passive fund. Beware of the emotional aspect: it was your mother's home, it's going to be your home, but for seven years it's just going to be a box for making money out of people who won't give a fig about that.
Accidental Landlord
Jr. Member
Posts: 70

Just trying my best

« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2020, 01:46:07 PM »

I also allow pets against my own personal preference but since my property is a family home type, I would be too restricted in choices of tenants if I were to not allow pets. The conditions are only one or 2 max small/lap dogs/cats - I have pointed out that there are guidelines by the RSPCA regarding how much space big dogs need so there are objective reasons not just my whim.
The main thing is if the tenants are happy with their pet then I agree, hopefully they will be long term which is worth more to me in the scheme of things.
Plus we are allowed to charge a slightly higher rent to allow for possible extra cleaning and pay for any damage and extra inspections so it's up to you how you want to do it.
I did have one tenant who smuggled a cat on moving in day and when I saw it, claimed they were looking after it for a relative. They signed a pet clause then but it was absolutely indicative of the way they conducted the tenancy subsequently.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2020, 01:48:28 PM by eps501 »
Hero Member
Posts: 784

I like property

« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2020, 06:16:13 PM »

I allow all pets in two properties,but only cats or birds in the 3 studios.In practice I don't get asked often, due to the type of properties and the tenants they attract.If someone asks permission upfront I take it as a good sign,and would certainly agree from experience that people who love their animals will be inclined to stay put when they have a landlord who accepts them. 
Newbie
Posts: 24

I like property

« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2020, 07:43:43 PM »

I don't see any reason to not allow pets if they are suitable for the home.

Pet damage can still be taken out of the deposit such as ripped sofa, stains to carpet etc.

However if the landlord agrees for the tenant to keep pets then  things like scratches to the floor will be accepted as fair wear and tear.  I would usually advise upping the rent slightly to pay for fair wear and tear damage.
Newbie
Posts: 3

I like property

« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2020, 01:05:19 AM »

I allow pets (including dogs). A property that's set up for average tenants should be able to cope with the average pet. Just make it clear that pet damage is not normal wear and tear. You can't take an extra deposit these days because of the limits on the maximum total deposit but, if it means you get tenants that stay longer, you're quids in anyway.

I take it you've done your sums and decided renting the property out makes sense for you, rather than just selling up and putting the money in a passive fund. Beware of the emotional aspect: it was your mother's home, it's going to be your home, but for seven years it's just going to be a box for making money out of people who won't give a fig about that.

Thanks Simon

We have done the sums and it is a no brainer, particularly as we will only have 60% mortgage. We always hoped to live there one day, and this makes it possible. Emotional aspect fine as we will be gutting it and doing major alterations when we finally move in.
Newbie
Posts: 3

I like property

« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2020, 01:07:44 AM »

Thanks for replies and comments, it is being marketed as a family home (it is 8 minutes walk from ofsted outstanding primary school), so pets it is.
Pages: [1]
Print