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Tenants didn't notice mould

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Author Topic: Tenants didn't notice mould  (Read 2565 times)
Guest
« on: January 05, 2014, 09:11:15 AM »

My tenants ................. well what can I say. 

How they didn't notice mould in their bedroom I do not know. 

I have read up on this website, about mould.  Not sure who's fault it is .... mine initially I suppose as the ridge tiles lost their mortar.  But tenant fault for not darn well noticing it.

Now I have two walls which need about 3 ft hight at the most covered in mould.

The walls have been mat painted before tenant moved in. 

The rain got in because of the bad gales and winds taking off the old mortar.  We have immediately sorted out the ridge tiles and re mortared.  But the water has gone down the caverty wall, which has cause the mould. 

I was wondering I do the mould treatment, will that work is the wall is still damp?

Please help
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Donald Trumps Son

« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2014, 11:22:45 AM »

Before painting etc why not try a dehumidifier first?  A domestic one would be fine but you'd probably get it dried out better if you hired a commercial one from HSS or similar.
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« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2014, 09:17:04 AM »

Dliute 1 part bleach to 4 parts water, put in spray bottle, spray, leave, mould "gone"

Honest.
Guest
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2014, 12:18:34 PM »

Out of curiosity,
have you used third-party property inventory services before your tenants moved in??

Problems like that one are  apart of "fear wear and tear".
I have recently started working with an small inventory company, where I had to take a number of courses and test and etc. bla, bla.

My point is that mould is maybe among top 5 reasons for Landlord-tenant issues and clerks are supposed to find stuff like that, so people do not end up in a situation like the one you're in..

PS: Bleach does work. Tested!  ;D
« Last Edit: December 02, 2014, 08:14:46 AM by Charline Clerk »
Newbie
Posts: 2

I like property

« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2016, 01:55:05 PM »

May be your tenants have seen it but they are too lazy to do something. Dehumidifier is a good decision. One dehumidifier should be sufficient to keep the relative humidity below the 65% that mould needs to grow.
Jr. Member
Posts: 51

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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2016, 04:20:16 PM »

Generally if airing the room out for 3 days doesn't stop it from coming, then you have a problem.
I've never done the bleach things, but the last time I had this problem I had to remove a window frame and dig out the cavity wall insulation that was causing the problem!

Regardless, I would make sure the room ahs been ventilated properly before doing anything.
Newbie
Posts: 1

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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2017, 12:59:32 PM »

Before painting etc why not try a dehumidifier first?  A domestic one would be fine but you'd probably get it dried out better if you hired a commercial one from HSS or similar.

If you're looking for a good dehumidifier, may I suggest a couple.

This one seems like it would suit your needs perfectly if you know that the trouble area is just the one wall. http://amzn.to/2iQA7oA

If the problem appears to be on a larger scale, then I would suggest this dehumidifier. http://amzn.to/2k3MjPJ

You may also be interested in this relatively new website http://www.mouldremoving.com. Reviewing different mould prevention products for different levels of severity.
Newbie
Posts: 30

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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2017, 01:19:10 PM »

Sadly I too have had this issue in the past. However, the tenants that I had at the time neglected to tell me that one of the walls in their lounge was slowly being covered in black mould. Unfortunately this led to costly repairs and being unable to rent the property out for an extended period of time. I would strongly recommend using a letting agent that carries out periodic inspections every 3-6 months. This is an excellent way of ensuring that the property is not falling into disrepair and benefits both the landlord and the tenant.

- Jeff
Newbie
Posts: 12

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« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2017, 01:42:33 AM »

Advice above very thorough & adding thoughts of someone stung by learning hard way which cost me & continues.  With inspections my agents do 4 a year BUT they are cursory & as these agents are happy telling lies & saving tenants often achieved by lies.  What do they actually check - aint gonna move furniture & stuff for sure, are they even looking in each room? Will you trust whatever they say or check yourself - think self check better option wished I did.  You have right to arrange - take friend & get advice what you can check - clearly not going though clothes, can you look under furniture if possible its hiding damage? Funny thought had after buying house & finding rubbish water pressure - that cost me few years later, decided if ever buying property again check it - just need to use loo nothing outrageous to ask & washing your hands normal. Maybe OTT but takes tenants eyes off you in your house, your not rifling personal stuff & poss find indicators how property kept - cleanliness of loo, bath, basin, are fittings hanging off etc so  worth consideration at least.
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